Call for Applications: Strategic Research Consultant

29th June 2022 by Adriana Sahagún Martínez

The Centre is looking for a strategic research consultant to conduct a mapping and support event content preparations during the initial phase of its new initiative “Anticipating Futures for Civil Society Operating Space”. The initiative’s overall aim is to strengthen anticipatory capacities and future readiness of civic space-focused professionals in international and national civil society organisations.

The Centre is commissioning a consultant to:

  1. Draw out the potential connections between how governments frame and respond to crises, including complex, uncertain future events like climate disruptions, and the implications for civil society action and operating space. 
  2. Explore how states have pivoted to security framings in crises, the impact this has had on civic space and operating conditions, and the signals CSOs should increasingly become aware of. 
  3. Explore emergent opportunities for civil society from previous crises – such as COVID-19 – which served to change or influence state perceptions, narratives and framings of civil society.  
  4. Outline previous and current work in the field on “civic space futures” (e.g. International Center for Not-for-Profit Law’s (ICNL) Civic Space 2040 initiative of 2020).
  5. Identify gaps that require collective sector approaches and initiatives.  
  6. Prepare the results of this mapping in writing (report of ca. 15 pages) or as a visualisation/map.

    Find the full tender and how to apply here

    The Centre invites qualified individuals, pairs or small teams to submit a proposal for the requested services. The application needs to be submitted by 15 July 2022.

    If you meet the selection criteria, please submit your application to Eva Gondorová and Miriam Niehaus including:

    1. Cover letter (no more than 3 pages), including:
    • A brief description of your experience and expertise in the field that illustrates your overall qualifications and capabilities for this scope of work, including two examples of your previous comparable work;
    • A brief description of your understanding of the scope of services and proposed methodology for the work;
    • Your consultancy rate (amount in EUR/day) and amount of working days.

      2. Your CV.

        3. Two references that can be contacted should you be shortlisted.

        Communications Manager

        International Civil Society Centre


        Call for Applications: Research Consultant

        27th June 2022 by Adriana Sahagún Martínez

        The Centre is looking for a research consultant to support its Solidarity Action Network (SANE) by capturing three to five case studies looking at how international civil society organisations (ICSOs) and CSOs have dealt with cyberattacks and digital risks. This will be an extension of the Solidarity Playbook – a collection of case studies and best practices on strategies, resilience, and solidarity mechanisms – with a topical focus on cybersecurity.

        SANE focuses on strengthening resilience of and solidarity among civil society actors when faced with civic space restrictions or changing operating conditions. It connects organisations across all sub-sectors and brings them into discussions on civic space challenges and opportunities.

        The Solidarity Playbook is an integral part of SANE with a focus on collecting case studies and best practices to help other ICSOs respond to undue scrutiny and challenges, and to enable learning on how to act in solidarity with civil society actors, particularly local partners.

        The Centre is commissioning a consultant to:

        1. Review and adjust the existing framework of the Solidarity Playbook case studies to accommodate the topical focus on cybersecurity.
        2. Conduct desk review and analysis of any written documentation (either publicly available or made available by contributing organisations).
        3. Conduct interviews with case study partners.
        4. Produce drafts of three to five case studies in a written form, including executive summary.
        5. Refine the case studies based on feedback received from the case study partners, the Centre and the CyberPeace Institute.
        6. Submit final case studies.

        Find the full tender and how to apply here

        The Centre invites qualified individuals to submit a proposal for the requested services. The application needs to be submitted by 25 July 2022.

        If you meet the selection criteria, please submit your application to Eva Gondorová including:

        1. Cover letter (no more than 3 pages), including:
          • A brief description of your experience and expertise in the field that illustrates
          your overall qualifications and capabilities for this scope of work, including two
          examples of your previous comparable work
          • Your consultancy rate (amount in EUR/day) and amount of working days
        2. Your CV
        3. Two references that can be contacted should you be shortlisted.

        Communications Manager

        International Civil Society Centre


        Leading in TUNA times

        27th June 2022 by Wolfgang Jamann

        Six months into the year, you surely had your share of physical meetings and conferences yet. How did they feel? A combination of personal warmth, anxiety, confusion, and an irrational sense of ‘newness’? At least that’s how it felt when 17 of the Centre’s member CEOs met in person for their annual ‘Vision Works’ retreat in Switzerland, last month.

        There’s much to say about the re-discovery of informal conversations and building personal networks in such conferences. Besides the benefits of peer-to-peer exchanges for one’s mental health, one also wonders how today’s leadership challenges in a complex world have suffered from the two years of minimised personal meeting opportunities.

        The complexities of our environment have been described in more recent debates as characterised by Turbulence, Uncertainty, Novelty and Ambiguity (TUNA). And the difference to previous futures narratives being the acknowledgement that ‘we don’t know anymore, what we don’t know’.

        Leading in a ‘tuna world’ requires specific approaches and talents. The steering ‘on sight’, the prioritisation of values over outputs, the ability to use scenarios, increase diversity, the flexibility to embrace emergent change with a long-term view, change direction and unlearn if needed. And it also asks for personal credibility, empathy, approachability, and open discourse – all more difficult to maintain in virtual communication.

        So now that we have moved into a ‘new normal’ mode, trying to combine the best of virtual and personal, and being faced with a world that has changed again (and keeps changing), how do we talk to each other? And how do civil society leaders steer their organisations, support their staff, and provide confidence and direction, particularly as there is a continued struggle with overload, the pace of change, change fatigue, and exhaustion and tiredness of the workforce (not least because of the COVID impacts).

        And how do you lead a new generation of colleagues, and ensure new leadership takes up responsibilities? How do you intensify cross-cutting ethical ambitions, and focus on values, mandates and purpose when operational demands still dominate the work?

        Compare these challenges with the latest results of the Interaction survey of member CEOs, confirming the high pace and significant depth of changes in the environment, the business models, operating models and programme priorities. Many organisations shifting power to the global South, yet how do you ensure alignment by letting go of overly centralised management?

        Looking at the high relevance of megatrends like climate change, power shift and digitalisation (including the navigation of cybersecurity), we find that civil society organisations involved in development cooperation and humanitarian aid, even if they are urgently needed in the global discourse around those trends, are often still in reaction/crisis mode, partly constrained by restrictive donor policies, operational challenges, homegrown problems and colonial legacy.

        CSO leaders grapple with complexities and interconnectedness, and the scale of the crises is challenging established management and governance practices.

        When we met in Switzerland, some promising ideas were developed around authenticity in the non-profit world, increased ambition around our mandates, new forms of political communication, more focus on values and the tackling of double standards that are being seen around us – whether it is the special treatment of the crisis in and around Ukraine, or the need to accelerate decolonisation in the sector.

        The growing responsibilities (and opportunities) for civil society organisations became more evident in this space. We need more innovative and bold actions to take shape. It is no longer enough to set up intentions or keep our spirit. We must collaborate and implement these ideas to rise to the “tuna” challenge.

        Wolfgang Jamann

        Executive Director

        International Civil Society Centre

        Dr. Wolfgang Jamann is Executive Director of the International Civil Society Centre. Until January 2018 he was Secretary General and CEO of CARE International (Geneva). Before that he led NGO Deutsche Welthungerhilfe and the Alliance 2015, a partnership of 7 European aid organisations. From 2004-2009 he was CEO & Board member of CARE Deutschland-Luxemburg and President of the CARE Foundation. Previously, he worked for World Vision International as a regional representative in East Africa (Kenya) & Head of Humanitarian Assistance at WV Germany. After his Ph.D. dissertation in 1990 he started his career in development work at the German Foundation for International Development, later for the UNDP in Zambia. As a researcher and academic, he has published books and articles on East & Southeast Asia contributing to international studies on complex humanitarian emergencies and conflict management.


        Community-Driven Data as a Tool to Foster Equal Rights and Non-Discrimination

        16th June 2022 by Chandani Lopez Peralta

        The global pandemic has further exacerbated the long-standing structural inequalities and governance weaknesses around the world. As a result, an increasing number of communities are falling further behind the ambitious plan of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to “leave no one behind.” From 30 May to 3 June 2022, this year’s World Justice Forum brought together hundreds of leaders and experts from a broad spectrum of disciplines and geographies in the Hague to talk about these challenges and find effective measures to build fairer and healthier communities 

        Michelle Bachelet, High Commissioner for Human Rights, UN echoed:

        Justice means equality. Justice means fairness. Justice means accountability, fighting impunity and offering redress. It also means leaving no one behind and leaving no one behind means involving marginalised groups in decision making. 

        Read reflections from the LNOB Partnership’s working session at WJF

        Chandani Lopez Peralta

        Project Manager

        International Civil Society Centre

        Chandani joined the Centre as a Project Manager in May 2022. She supports the Leave No One Behind Partnership that promotes the collection and use of community-driven data to give voice and agency to marginalised communities. Prior to joining the Centre, Chandani headed communications and outreach at TolaData. In addition, Chandani has coordinated many projects for local and international NGOs, working closely with refugees, individuals with disabilities and other marginalised groups in Nepal, Germany and the US. Chandani holds a master’s degree in International Development and Social Change from Clark University, USA and a B.Sc. in Mass Communications with an emphasis on PR and Advertising from Minnesota State University Moorhead